Happy Resurrection Day

What a gloriously beautiful Resurrection Day here in KY. What began as a rather chilly dawn, has developed into the perfect day.

We began our celebration at dawn, meeting with fellow believers for a community Sonrise service at the local cemetery. That was followed by breakfast at our church.  We then came back for our usual eleven o’clock service and concluded with an egg hunt for the youth.

I hope you have enjoyed this most blessed day.

“God is good, all the time. And all the time, God is good”.

Blessed Hope Farm

Blessed Hope Farm

Easter 2014

Blessed Hope Farm 2014

 

 

 

6 Essential Foundations Of A Great Garden

Originally posted on TheSurvivalPlaceBlog:

vegetable garden -- cornerstones and foundations

By John

Beginning a new vegetable garden does not mean that one has to live on a large plot of land. Vegetable gardens are possible and doable in sectioned off backyards, and even in potted gardens kept on window sills and porches. When one decides to begin a garden, he or she should determine how much land is available for growing, what type of soil is needed, and what vegetables will grow in the existing climate.

1. The Foundation of a Good Garden – The Soil

The first step to caring for a garden is to know what type of soil the vegetables should be planted in. Not all soil is fit for growing edible foods. Poor soil either has too many nutrients and will damage the plant as it grows, the wrong pH balance, or too few nutrients. These issues can be corrected by adding in different types of

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Crazy Weather, eh?

April 14th I knew I had to take a picture of this gorgeous tree bursting with spring:

Blessed Hope Farm

Blessed Hope Farm

Good thing too, cause this was my view the very next morning:

April 15 2014

Blessed Hope Farm

Crazy weather! I sure hope it doesn’t damage the local crops already in the fields and orchards.

Intentional Fun with Playdough

As I posted in the Home school Tab (above), we try to make everything we do here at Blessed Hope Farm serve multiple purposes.

Playdough is no exception.  Not only do the kids just love playing with it (I do too, I must admit), but it is so useful in teaching simple preschool skills:

using play scissors and other tools to cut and shape the dough (hand-eye coordination, motor skills)

identifying colors and even the colors resulting from smooshing all the colors into one ball (brown is the usual result lol)

imagination/creativity

spatial reasoning

sharing the tools and colors

All of these are great reasons to invest in some colorful Playdough (or make your own!), but one of my favorites is the sensory input it provides for Beauty. She is a sensory seeker, which means sometimes she requires pressure and deep massage. Rolling, smashing, and pounding the dough is an excellent way for her to get the pressure her arms seek.

Here she is using a  potato masher to apply pressure to the dough and make fun shapes. What are some ways you like to use Playdough?

 

Blessed Hope Farm

Blessed Hope Farm

Motherhood isn’t tougher than fatherhood, but maybe we should all stop competing

Originally posted on The Matt Walsh Blog:

untitled (49)

I have to admit upfront that I have developed an immunity to ‘tearjerker’ viral ads. You see, I fell into a vat of Hallmark Cards and maple syrup when I was a child, and emerged from that scarring incident completely impervious to the sugary, contrived sentimentality of clever marketing campaigns.

I’m constantly greeted by people posting videos on Facebook, promising that, if I just watch to the end, I’ll ‘be a wreck’ because it’s the ‘saddest/sweetest thing’ I’ll have ‘EVER seen, EVER.’  Usually I skim right past, but sometimes I’ll click the link like the sucker that I am, and yet again confirm that I am incapable of shedding a tear over a commercial for sponges or minivans.

All of this emoting also damages everyone’s credibility. Honestly, I don’t know how to take someone who posts a status about how they just returned from a funeral and it was the saddest experience of their life…

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Godly Contentment

Originally posted on The Jericho Blog:

“I know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want. I can do everything through him who gives me strength.” Phil 4:12-13

The apostle Paul says, “I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation.” “I can do everything through him who gives me strength.”

Does this mean that in any and every situation in his life, Paul had to turn to Jesus and pray, “Oh Lord, give me the strength to do this thing, Oh Lord, give me the strength to do that thing?” Who could live their life effectively like that?

Paul wasn’t repeatedly asking for a temporary strengthening. Instead, He is revealing to us that his willpower is no longer…

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6 Surprising Off-Grid Uses For Hydrogen Peroxide

Originally posted on TheSurvivalPlaceBlog:

hydrogen peroxide off-grid uses

By Tricia Drevets

When I was a girl, I was often plagued by painful canker sores. I remember my mother taking a mysterious brown bottle out of the medicine cabinet and pouring some of strange-tasting foaming liquid into a cup for me to use as a mouth rinse. Through my own research as a teenager, I discovered my canker sores were caused by food allergies, and I never gave much more thought to that little brown bottle.

That is, not until recent years when, as a mother myself, I discovered that little brown bottle of hydrogen peroxide can do much more than just serve as a mouth rinse. In fact, today I keep several bottles handy in my home for all kinds of purposes. Priced at under a dollar for 16 ounces at most retailers, 3 percent hydrogen peroxide is one of the most useful household products you can find…

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5 Common Homesteading Myths

Originally posted on TheSurvivalPlaceBlog:

homesteading

By Josh

Several years ago when I was new to preparedness and the homesteading movement, I set off to built my own self-sufficient lifestyle. With starry eyes and a heart full of dreams of an idyllic countryside farm I got my start…and was quickly had a few preconceived notions beat out of me, some positive and some negative. I notice that this can be true for many, and so I thought that it would be helpful to any preppers looking to go the self-sufficiency route for us to look at the most common myths surrounding homesteading.

#5: Homesteading Saves You Money

Let me be clear: self-sufficient living definitely doesn’t require all the expenses of buying everything from stores and so on. However, you will have quite a few costs to get yourself started that might make you wince. Land is one major cost, as is the lumber and other materials…

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